diy, drink, fermentation, health, kombucha, Nutrition Post, Uncategorized

Health Benefits of Fermented Foods

02de146a9bcad5370c05b8205dd447a96c595baeFermented foods have been used for centuries in many cultures worldwide such as that of Eastern Europe, Asia, and Africa, as a means to preserve food and increase its palatability[1]. Foods such as yogurt, pickles, sauerkraut, kimchi, miso, and tempeh fit under the fermented foods category. Fermented beverages have also been produced and consumed for the same reasons. Some of these fermented beverages may sound familiar to you: Kvass, kombucha, and kefir to name a few. These foods and beverages are known to have many health benefits including promoting the health of the digestive system, aiding detoxification and contributing to good overall health. Fermented food and beverages contain lactic acid from the fermentation process, which has been shown to suppress certain bacteria in the intestines, providing antibiotic properties to the body[2]. The health of the digestive system affects the health of other parts of the body including skin and mental health so it is no surprise that fermented foods have an abundance of health properties[3]. Fermented foods have a positive effect on balancing intestinal PH, thus establishing normal intestinal flora, which is essential to digestion[4].  Fermented foods, specifically kombucha aids detoxification of the body, by producing “coupled glucuronic acid” that binds to metabolic waste products and environmental toxins and poisons[5]. Additionally, fermented foods may help the body to absorb antioxidants[6].

Not all fermented products are beneficial to the body, for example, fermented soy products may be high in sodium and store purchased fermented foods may have been pasteurized  (heated at a high temperature) thus eliminating the beneficial bacteria[7].

Making your own fermented foods and beverages can be an easy and inexpensive alternative to purchasing the often expensive foods regularly.

Here are links to producing your own fermented foods and beverages:

[1] Baschali, Aristea, et al. “Traditional low-alcoholic and non-alcoholic fermented beverages consumed in European countries: a neglected food group.” Nutrition Research Reviews (2017): 1-24.

[2] Kombucha is useful for gastrointestinal ills. (1995). Better Nutrition for Today’s Living, 57(12), 12. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.lib.ryerson.ca/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/194189055?accountid=13631

[3] Kombucha is useful for gastrointestinal ills. (1995). Better Nutrition for Today’s Living, 57(12), 12. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.lib.ryerson.ca/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/194189055?accountid=13631

[4] Kombucha is useful for gastrointestinal ills. (1995). Better Nutrition for Today’s Living, 57(12), 12. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.lib.ryerson.ca/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/194189055?accountid=13631

[5] Kombucha is useful for gastrointestinal ills. (1995). Better Nutrition for Today’s Living, 57(12), 12. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.lib.ryerson.ca/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/194189055?accountid=13631

[6] Komaroff, A. L. (2015, Aug 09). Health benefits of fermented foods not yet proven ask doctor K. Capital Retrieved from http://ezproxy.lib.ryerson.ca/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1703423347?accountid=13631

[7] Komaroff, A. L. (2015, Aug 09). Health benefits of fermented foods not yet proven ask doctor K. Capital Retrieved from http://ezproxy.lib.ryerson.ca/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1703423347?accountid=13631

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